Getting a pet. Adopting or getting a new pet is a big event for any family and pet insurance is often overlooked, says Nick Braun, founder of PetInsuranceQutes.com, in Columbus, Ohio. "However, the best time to invest in pet health insurance is when you first get your pet," he says. "Owning a dog or cat is a long-term commitment that can cost thousands of dollars over time, and making sure you have coverage in case of a major illness or accident is a key part of the equation of responsible pet ownership."

Children. Having children is another benchmark that individuals will begin exploring life insurance options, Mehta says. "When there is a child involved, it's paramount to have proper insurance in place that will ensure the future liabilities are covered," he says. "Since one of the most important aspects of life insurance is income replacement, life insurance becomes invaluable to cover future education expenses of the child if the primary income earner in the family is no more."
In this Specialization, you will understand how investment strategies are designed to reach financial goals in a global context. You will learn the theory that underlies strong investment decisions, as well as practical, real-world skills that you can apply when discussing investment proposals with your advisor, managing your personal assets or your client’s investment portfolio. You will start by developing a global understanding of financial markets and what impacts rational and irrational behaviors have in finance at the micro and macro levels. You will then learn how to adequately build and manage a portfolio with a long-term view while gaining an appreciation for novel research advances in finance and related areas as well as future trends that are shaping the investment management industry. In the final Capstone Project, you will create a sensible 5-year investment plan that accounts for an investor's goals and constraints in a dynamic economic landscape. Key speakers from UBS, our corporate partner, will contribute to this specialization by providing you with practical insights they have gathered through years of experience working for the world’s largest wealth manager. Director of this Specialization and main teaching contributor: Dr. Michel Girardin, Lecturer in Macro-Finance, University of Geneva
In Australia, a company providing financial services must obtain a licence from the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC). However, there are no requirements for the individuals providing the financial advice, and the ASIC website states that "Holding an AFS licence does not provide a guarantee of the probity or quality of the licensee's services."[4][5]

Outside of Quebec, there are currently no restrictions, no educational prerequisites, and no licensing requirements for individuals calling themselves financial planners, or for businesses using "financial planning" in their name or services offered. As of July 2020, Ontario and Saskatchewan have introduced legislation to regulate financial planning titles, but the legislation has yet to be enacted.[7][8]

It is probably appropriate for an investment firm to persuade its clients to assess performance over longer periods (e.g., 3 to 5 years) to smooth out very short-term fluctuations in performance and the influence of the business cycle. This can be difficult however and, industry wide, there is a serious preoccupation with short-term numbers and the effect on the relationship with clients (and resultant business risks for the institutions).

Philosophy refers to the overarching beliefs of the investment organization. For example: (i) Does the manager buy growth or value shares, or a combination of the two (and why)? (ii) Do they believe in market timing (and on what evidence)? (iii) Do they rely on external research or do they employ a team of researchers? It is helpful if any and all of such fundamental beliefs are supported by proof-statements.
Financial planners explicitly providing financial advice and managing money for clients are considered fiduciaries. This means they are legally obligated to act in the client’s best interests and they can’t personally benefit from the management of client assets. They are expected to manage these assets for the client’s benefit rather than their own. Fiduciary specifics can vary. For example, registered investment advisers (RIA) are fiduciaries under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. They are regulated by the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) or state securities regulators.
×

For Security Reasons Please Verify That You Are Not A Robot