A fee-only CFP typically charges by the hour (usually $200 to $400) or by the task (a flat $1,000 to $3,000 fee, for example). Some might charge based on the size of the investment portfolio they are managing for you; this is called an assets-under-management fee and is typically 1% of your portfolio balance per year. The initial consultation to discuss your needs and their services is usually free.
Portfolio return may be evaluated using factor models. The first model, proposed by Jensen (1968), relies on the CAPM and explains portfolio returns with the market index as the only factor. It quickly becomes clear, however, that one factor is not enough to explain the returns very well and that other factors have to be considered. Multi-factor models were developed as an alternative to the CAPM, allowing a better description of portfolio risks and a more accurate evaluation of a portfolio's performance. For example, Fama and French (1993) have highlighted two important factors that characterize a company's risk in addition to market risk. These factors are the book-to-market ratio and the company's size as measured by its market capitalization. Fama and French therefore proposed three-factor model to describe portfolio normal returns (Fama–French three-factor model). Carhart (1997) proposed to add momentum as a fourth factor to allow the short-term persistence of returns to be taken into account. Also of interest for performance measurement is Sharpe's (1992) style analysis model, in which factors are style indices. This model allows a custom benchmark for each portfolio to be developed, using the linear combination of style indices that best replicate portfolio style allocation, and leads to an accurate evaluation of portfolio alpha.

Getting a pet. Adopting or getting a new pet is a big event for any family and pet insurance is often overlooked, says Nick Braun, founder of PetInsuranceQutes.com, in Columbus, Ohio. "However, the best time to invest in pet health insurance is when you first get your pet," he says. "Owning a dog or cat is a long-term commitment that can cost thousands of dollars over time, and making sure you have coverage in case of a major illness or accident is a key part of the equation of responsible pet ownership."
People refers to the staff, especially the fund managers. The questions are, Who are they? How are they selected? How old are they? Who reports to whom? How deep is the team (and do all the members understand the philosophy and process they are supposed to be using)? And most important of all, How long has the team been working together? This last question is vital because whatever performance record was presented at the outset of the relationship with the client may or may not relate to (have been produced by) a team that is still in place. If the team has changed greatly (high staff turnover or changes to the team), then arguably the performance record is completely unrelated to the existing team (of fund managers).

Home purchase. It's "staggering" to discover how many individuals and couples don't look into life insurance when there is a home purchase, Mehta says. "You have just acquired a major liability, and you need to ensure the insurance at least offsets the mortgage amount. Without proper insurance planning, the family could potentially lose the home, face major setbacks in their credit and deal with major financial hurdles on the road to recovery."


Choosing a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional is as important as choosing a doctor or lawyer; it's a very personal relationship. Many CFP® professionals specialize in working with certain types of clients, such as small-business owners, executives or retirees. Some specialize in certain areas of planning such as retirement, divorce or asset management. We recommend you interview at least three CFP® professionals to find the right one that best serves your needs.
Our Global Client Business professionals partner with a diverse client base to identify opportunities that shape their portfolios and long-term investment goals. Institutional clients include corporate and public pension funds, foundations and endowments, insurers, financial institutions and governments. Retail clients include financial intermediaries including wire-houses, regional broker-dealers, banks, insurance companies and registered investment advisors. 

Many RIAs are fee-only advisers, meaning they can’t work off commission or sell a client any investment products that aren’t in the client's best interests. Financial planners don’t have to be RIAs to work under this business model. Fee-only financial planners generally make their money as an hourly rate, an annual fixed retainer or as a percentage of the investment assets they manage on behalf of their clients. They also have a fiduciary duty to their clients over any broker or dealer.

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